Herkunft der Familie Struck

A relative recently asked me what research I had on the origins of our Struck ancestors, because he is planning a trip to Germany in the near future. I thought I would share this information on my blog instead of a private email, so that it is available to anyone else interested in this.

Here’s the good news for my cousin: I think I have a pretty good idea of the location of our German origins, and even where the old church records are kept.

The bad news? That region is now a part of Poland, since World War II. Let’s hope our relative decides to expand his trip! One day I hope to commission an experienced genealogical researcher to search those archives.

THE FAMILY LEGEND

To begin, let’s take a look at where this information comes from. Family stories say that my great-grandfather Frank Struck emigrated from Plummer, Germany. My research has not identified the existence of such a place; my best guess is that this may have been derived from Pommern, the German word for the region of Pomerania. The only other clue given was that Frank studied to be a cobbler in Berlin as a youth; this might lead one to think that the family lived fairly near that city, but it is certainly inconclusive.

THE CLUES

My first step was to look for historical documents that might shed some more light. My best sources are the ship manifests from Frank’s journey to America in 1895 on the S.S. Wittekind. These documents are readily available, courtesy of Ellis Island and Ancestry.

Struck, Frank ship records The Wittekind arrived 10 April 1895 departed from Bremen_edit1

A little side note on the S.S. Wittekind: when our Struck ancestors sailed to Baltimore (and then Ellis Island) in 1895, the ship was just one year old. It was built for the Norddeutscher Lloyd German sailing company,to use on their Bremerhaven-New York line. It took a fortnight to travel the route, and it was the first twin-screw steamer built for them. In 1917 it was seized by the US Army and renamed the Iroquois, and later the USS Freedom. It was scrapped in 1924.

Struck, Frank ship records The Wittekind

Here’s a close-up of the ship manifest created when they first arrived at the Port of Baltimore (before they sailed on to Ellis Island):

Struck, Frank ship records The Wittekind_edit3

The first person in this group is Friedrich Birkholz, a 30 year old laborer. His wife Wilhelmina is Frank Struck’s sister. Below their three children is Albertine and Caroline Ziemann. You’ve seen in a previous post that the Ziemanns are known cousins to the Struck family. My best guess is that Caroline Ziemann is actually Frank Struck’s mother (there is much evidence to corroborate this). Below these two women is Ida Struck, another sister to Frank. And finally, we have Frank Struck himself, age 20.

What’s most helpful here is the column titled “Last Residence”. All of the family state that their previous hometown was Minten, except for Frank: he says it is Naugard. Simply to muddy it up a bit more, Frank’s brother Carl Struck emigrated to America two years before this group. On his ship manifest, he listed his hometown as Glietzig, Germany.

Struck, Carl ship record 02 May 1893 ship The Stuttgart_edit

DECIPHERING AND TRANSLATING

Where do we go from here? A whole bunch of Googling to learn more about these towns! Some trial and error led me to discover the current names of these communities as they are now listed in Poland:

Naugard (town) = Nowogard
Naugard (district/county) = Gmina Nowogard
Minten = Mietno
Gleitzig = Glicko

What I’ve also found is that the small, rural communities of Minten/Mietno and Gleitzig/Glicko are very near the larger town of Naugard, and all are within the county of Naugard. Here is a current map that might help illustrate this:

Map of former Struck homeland Nowogard_close-up

If you look at the scale reference, these tiny towns are only about a mile or two apart, and quite close to Naugard/Nowogard. It appears that Naugard county has long been a rural one: in 1925, the community of Minten had 197 residents living in 37 households, while Glietzig boasted 189 residents in 33 households!

The proximity of these locations seems to help explain the varying answers given on the ship manifests. One word of caution: it is admittedly not completely verified that this is our ancestral home, particularly as we are taking these facts from one primary source. However, it is a very likely connection, and one that I look forward to expanding my research on.

One other interesting fact: all of the residents in Minten and Gleitzig were of the Protestant faith. This will be important when I discuss resources below.

RESOURCES

There are a few resources that have been immensely helpful to me in researching my Pomeranian roots: The Full Wiki contains a list of Pomeranian place names, and their Polish name today. Secondly, the Pommerndatenbank contains some amazing genealogical resources concerning both Pomeranian communities and the families that lived there. Finally, the Information System for Pomerania lists a bounty of historical information about these communities that can help provide some insight into the lives of our ancestors.

Traditionally, our European ancestors recorded their most important life events in the church register: births, confirmations, marriages, deaths… all would be written into the book. So it is quite exciting to learn that the church registers were in fact saved, and archived in the Kirchenbücher im Landeskirchlichen Archiv in Greifswald, Germany. It should be a bit easier to research since all of these families attended church in one denomination. I’m eager to see what information might be available to us in researching our Struck family roots!

Frank & Mary Struck Family_1955

Frank & Mary Struck Family in 1955

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