Discovering Mary’s Beginnings

STRUCK Frank and Mary wedding pic

Frank & Mary on their wedding day.

I’d now like to turn my attention to Frank Struck’s wife, Maria Anna Bloedel (also written as Blödel). Frank and Mary were married in Lannon, Wisconsin in April 1901, six years after Frank’s arrival in America. The local newspaper reported their marriage on April 18, 1901:

BLOEDEL Mary marries Frank Struck news 18Apr1901_edit

Mary traveled to America with her mother Elizabeth and three siblings (William, Carl and Barbara) when she was just five years old. Research shows that other members of the Bloedel family had already established roots in the Wisconsin community in earlier years, and it is believed that Elizabeth chose to join them after becoming widowed in Germany (some family notes list Mary’s father’s name as Maechel or Michael Bloedel).

I haven’t been successful at untangling all of the Bloedel family line at this point, but it does appear that many Bloedel family members had emigrated to the Lannon/Menomonee Falls area. There is one clue in researching this line that might help corroborate Mary’s birthplace: several Bloedel “cousins” had opened a blacksmith shop in Lannon. As you’ll see further in the post, I found someone else of the same surname emigrating to Wisconsin with the listed occupation of blacksmith.

THE FAMILY LEGEND

Our family recorded Mary’s birthplace as Dodgelsheim, Germany. As with the Struck family, I haven’t found evidence of such a place. But looking for similar place names in a German gazeteer led me to find a town called Dolgesheim in Germany. It seems very similar in name, but are we correct in assuming this is the right place?

THE CLUES

I start by again turning to the ship transcript. Unfortunately, this manifest for Mary and her family only lists that they were German born (we are rarely lucky enough to get a hometown recorded on these, as it was in the Struck family example).

Bloedel Mary ship manifest 13 Sept 1888 Noordland_edit

Click on this image to view it at full size.

However, while searching to find Mary’s ship records, I came across a different manifest that lends us a small clue. Carl Bloedel arrived in America two years before Mary’s ship sailed. He lists his occupation as blacksmith, his intended destination as Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and his “starting point” as Dolgesheim.

Bloedel, Carl ship manifest 12 Aug 1886 The Rhynland to NY_edit

Click on the image to view it larger.

Is this 100% verification of Mary’s birthplace? Unfortunately, no. As I said earlier, I’ve had difficulty tracking all of the Bloedel relatives sufficiently to be sure this Carl Bloedel is even a relative. But it remains our best guess at this point.

You’ll note that there is something scribbled in the far right-hand column on Mary’s ship manifest that is hard to decipher, but it appears to be “settler”; in studying the full page, I find that the word “citizen” and “settler” is written beside some names in that section.

FURTHER RESEARCH

One interesting thing to note in the ship manifests above is that Mary’s family is travelling with two other Bloedels who are of unknown relation. It’s also interesting that the C. Bloedel in her group is the same age as Carl Bloedel in the second manifest.

A bit about the ship that carried Mary to America: the Noordland was built for the Red Star Line’s Antwerp-New York route and launched in 1884. It held accomodations for 619 passengers, 500 of these in third-class (steerage), which is where Mary’s family was housed.

Bloedel ship Noordland2

The Noordland

In 1886 the Noordland was disabled after colliding with the Cunard liner Servia in the North River because of thick snow and heavy mist. It resumed service in July 1888, two months before Mary’s trip. It was scrapped in 1908.

One other thing to note is the information I’ve found in German Genealogical Database, which lists a significant number of Bloedel persons living in Schornsheim, Germany. This might prove to be an important resource to pursue further as I research the Bloedel family line.

RESOURCES

I have bad news for my cousin: Dolgesheim is a good 8+ hour drive from Mietno, where our Struck ancestors originated.

Map - from Mietno to Dolgesheim

Dolgesheim is in the Rhineland-Palatinate state of Germany, also known as the Rheinland-Pfalz or Rheinhessen region. This is wine country, and Dolgesheim looks to be a charming village with a rich history according to their city website (in German). Schornsheim is only about 8 miles NW of there, and worthy of some genealogical investigation as well.

As you can see from these posts, the story of Frank & Mary’s ancestral origins is one that holds much yet to be discovered.

Frank and Mary Struck - 1951 - 50th wedding anniversary

Frank & Mary Struck on their 50th wedding aniversary in 1951

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One thought on “Discovering Mary’s Beginnings

  1. Morgan, I would like you to please contact me in reference to some more Strucks who lived in Lannon and Menomonee Falls. You may have some info on them you could share with me, or I have info on them that I could share with you. Looking forward to hearing from you. Please contact me at my e-mail address: lindar1509@gmail.com.

    Linda

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